Japanese Curry Hamburger

Curry hamburger’s very easy to make (and makes for WONderful leftovers) so we usually cook it on one of those weeknights where neither of us can be bothered to do a whole lot (usually by Wednesday).

Ingredients (for 2 plus leftovers):

  • 1-1.5 lbs. 1″-cubed small red potatoes or golden potatoes or—ooh—fingerling potatoes!
  • 1 box S&B – Golden Curry Sauce Mix – 3.5 Oz. (you can get the mild, medium, hot or extra hot, none of them are really that spicy)
  • a small yellow or white onion, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • at least one hamburger patty per person (we usually make 3-4 for leftovers)
  • rice on the side
  • a pinch per serving of parsley, chopped or dried

I’m being so imprecise because this recipe is quite variable and because I stopped following the directions on the box a long time ago. We prefer a 1:1 ratio of potato to hamburger with a lot of sauce to pour over rice.

We buy Bubba Burger sweet onion hamburger patties frozen because they’re yummy and cook in about 10 minutes directly from the freezer.

Sometimes we mix Worcestershire sauce with ground beef and green onions with hamburger meat and let them marinate then cook them that way. That’s MUCH tastier, but takes a whole lot more effort than this lazy-butt dish requires.

Curry is a strong flavor, so if you take the time to make a really fine home-ground hamburger, save it for the bun. Use less-fancy burgers for this. Lazy-butt, remember?!

Directions:

  • Cook the garlic and onions in a saucepan over medium heat with enough oil to make sure it doesn’t stick (maybe the garlic oil you made last time?) the kitchen smells amazing and someone comes in to say OMG WHAT ARE YOU MAKING?!…or until the onions are translucent.
  • Add the potatoes and enough water to cover them to the pot, maybe an inch or so more and bring the mixture to a boil.
  • One by one add 4-6 of the curry cubes (more for more spice), stirring gently until they’re all dissolved. Check the bottom of the pot for reluctant dissolvers, and sometimes if the water’s not boiling they’ll glue some potatoes together.  The sauce should thicken and not be runny, but also not be as thick as pudding. If it’s too thick, add water. Too thin, add another curry cube or 2. Store remaining cubes in the refrigerator.
  • Reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Cooking time is going to vary – if you cut the potatoes to the 1″ cubes as suggested, you’ll probably cook them for about 20 minutes, max. If your potatoes are cut 1/2″ or smaller, they’ll cook a lot faster (and now that you smell the onions and garlic that will be what you want).
  • Stir occasionally to make sure nothing’s burned to the bottom. Check after 12-13 minutes. When the potatoes are soft or the skins are coming away from the potatoes they’re done. If you peeled the potatoes (why would you go and do that?) fork them, and if they break easily, they’re done.
  • Cook the hamburgers while the curry is cooking per box instructions. Cook them just ’till the juices run clear, not cloudy or bloody, and they should be perfectly done.
  • Make rice in your trusty rice maker.
  • Plate the burger in a shallow bowly-plate that’s not too flat or in a large bowl. You can choose to put your rice in a bowl on the side or under the hamburger.  You can cut the burger, or leave it in a big pattie shape. Patties tend to be prettier and slow you down so you chew between bites when you’re really hungry.
  • Sprinkle on a pinch of parsley. The curry’s a monochrome saffron yellow color. To make things look more appetizing, and less like a thrown-together dish, add parsley, dried or fresh-chopped. You know those little green decorative bits scattered on your plate at the restaurant? Parsley. Add it right before serving so it doesn’t lose it’s color. I buy parsley in bulk, chop a ton of it, air-dry for a few hours, freeze. I don’t want to use  dried, but it’s just me and my husband right now, so I have to freeze it or it’ll go bad before I can use it up. As long as you don’t add too much, the frozen bits won’t cool the dish down.
  • When the curry’s done, pour it over the hamburger and eat.

Experiments: add apples, carrots, jicama, or other starchy, solid veggies, fried onions for a different flavor.

So that’s lazy-butt curry hamburger, which looks a lot more complicated than it actually is. After you make this a few times you’ll be able to eyeball it, and have to make up measurements like I did to tell someone else how to make it.

While you’re here – is there anything you want me to write about making? Hit me up on Twitter if so!